Phone: 717.531.1440

January is Cervical Health Awareness Month

According to the National Cervical Cancer Coalition, 70% of all adults have been infected with the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV), the virus that leads to cervical cancer and genital warts.  Fortunately, the majority of these individuals do not develop cervical cancer or warts. Often, their body’s immune system will naturally suppress the virus.  However, for those whose body’s do not, knowing how to detect cancer early can make the difference between life and death.

January is Cervical Health Awareness Month.  Since the 1940’s the National Cervical Cancer Coalition credits early detection tests with a 70% reduction in deaths from cervical cancer.  As soon as a woman reaches the age of 21, she should begin getting regular pap tests, a test that looks at the cellular growth of the cervix.  If abnormal cellular growth is detected, further testing may be required with a test called a colposcopy.  Recent guidelines now advise that women, who have normal pap tests, may be able to have less frequent pap tests. This is something that needs to be discussed with their health care provider.

Furthermore, unlike the 1940’s, there are two vaccines now available that have the potential of greatly reducing risk and incidence of cervical cancer.  It is recommended for girls and boys to get the vaccine between the ages of 11-26.  Regular use of condoms during sexual activity can also greatly reduce the risk. However, HPV is transmitted skin to skin and no intercourse is actually necessary to spread the virus.

Unfortunately, HPV infection is often symptomless and an individual is unaware that they are infected.  For this reason it is important for women to get regular cervical checks with a healthcare provider.  Every Friday from 8:30-3, Lebanon Family Health Services offers a walk-in-clinic for individuals to receive any of our medical services.  One service that is available is gynecological exams offered free or low cost based on household size and income.  As part of Cervical Health Awareness Month, take the first step in preventing cervical cancer.  Call our office to schedule an appointment-273-6741 or stop in during Friday walk-in clinic times.

New Year’s Resolution: Drink more water

Soon after the ball drops (or the bologna as we know New Years in Lebanon County), the next thing we usually do is proclaim our New Year’s Resolution.  Swearing off that last holiday cookie and promising to shed those extra five pounds put on over the holidays, we welcome in a new year.  This predictable tradition is the time when we get back on track to healthier eating and exercise.  However, as we realign ourselves, what about our children?  Will they also commit to the same New Year’s resolution?

While sugar consumption in children has increased, the holidays can’t be credited for this.  According to the Centers for Disease Control’s National Center for Health Statistics, 16% of children’s daily calories come from added sugar-this goes well beyond an overindulgence of holiday cookies and candy.  In fact, since the mid 1970’s the average intake of sugar among children has been slowly rising and the primary culprit—sugary beverages (colas, soft drinks and high sugar juices).  Furthermore, as the consumption of sugary beverages has risen the amount of milk and water children consume has decreased—therefore denying much needed nutrients for bone density and growth.

That is why that throughout the past year the staff at Lebanon Family Health has been out teaching about the 5210 concept.  It’s a simple daily diet concept for parents that recommend children get 5 fruits/vegetables a day, less than 2 hours of recreational screen time, get 1 hour of physical activity and 0 sugary beverages each day.

While encouraging a 5 year old to drink water instead of the red drink at the holiday party is a challenge, the staff at LFHS have been teaching children to drink water in a fun and entertaining way.  “Potter the Otter”, a helpful friend that likes to drink water is introduced to kids.  He teaches children and their parents about the sugar content in popular drinks such as soda, juices and chocolate milk.  Lessons on sugar content are also available for parents.  For more information on the “Potter the Otter” and other nutrition education lessons available at Lebanon Family Health, visit our website at www.lebanonfamilyhealth.org.

Celebrate the “Great American Smokeout” by having your workplace go “Smoke-free”

With over 4000 hazardous chemical components in secondhand smoke, it isn’t a surprise that the World Health Organization (WHO) found that secondhand smoke exposure is a major cause of lung cancer, coronary heart disease and cardiac death among non-smokers. Furthermore, WHO found that there is no safe level of exposure to tobacco smoke and that ventilation systems and designated smoking rooms do not provide effective protection to the public and company workers.  The International Labour Organization found that each year 200,000 workers die because of exposure to secondhand smoke in the workplace.

In recent years, many companies have seen the health and financial benefits of becoming a smoke-free workplace. As healthcare costs soar and as insurance policies charge higher rates to cover smokers, there has been a great benefit to businesses to change their policies regarding tobacco. Numerous studies have found a decline in hospital admissions for heart attacks. Among restaurant workers, there is a documented 26% decrease in respiratory symptoms. When smoke free workplace policies are implemented, there has been a 4% decrease in the number of smokers and a significant decrease in smoking among individuals who continue to smoke, according to the British Medical Journal. This decrease not only benefits the individual health of the workers, but saves on overall healthcare costs among those that participate in the company insurance plan.

Some of the most prevalent criticisms of tobacco free policies are that they will impact the companies “bottom line”. In reality, studies have found the opposite. Studies have found that when companies embrace smoke free policies they experience an increase in employee productivity, reduced sickness and reduced injuries. The Journal of the American Medical Association reported that if all US workplaces were smoke free, it would save $280 million in medical costs in the first 7 years.

On November 16, we recognized the “Great American Smokeout”. This year, make a bold move and ensure that your work site is tobacco free. At Lebanon Family Health Services we are working with companies to implement tobacco free policies that include a research based tobacco cessation class for employees called Freedom From Smoking© and/or a “fax-to-quit” program. Services are free and are available at your work site. For more information, call Holly at 273-6741 ext. 310.

Tropical Bean Salad

Tropical Bean Salad
Original Source
Makes:
6 Servings
Prep time: 10 minutes

This tangy salad is delicious as a side dish or as a topping for tacos, chicken, or fish. Mangoes are a tropical stone fruit. In the United States, Florida is the largest producer of mangoes.

Ingredients

3 1/2 cups Black beans, low-sodium, canned, drained, and rinsed or black beans, dry, cooked
1 1/2 cups Mango, canned, drained, diced
3/4 cup Tomato, fresh, 1/4″ diced
1 tablespoon Canola oil
2 tablespoons Apple cider vinegar
1/2 teaspoon Oregano, dried
1/4 teaspoon Black pepper, ground
3 cups Romaine lettuce, raw, chopped

Directions

1. In a medium bowl, mix together black beans, mango, and tomato to make a salad.
2. Prepare dressing: In a small bowl whisk together canola oil, apple cider vinegar, oregano, and pepper.
3. Toss black bean salad with dressing.
4. Cover and refrigerate. Chill for at least 2 hours to allow the flavors to fuse.
5. Serve 1 cup black bean salad over a 1/2 cup lettuce.
Critical Control Point: Hold at 40 °F or lower.

Notes

CACFP Crediting Information:
1 cup bean salad over 1/2 cup lettuce provides Legume as Meat Alternate: 1 1/2 oz. equivalent meat alternate, 3/8 cup vegetable, and 1/4 cup fruit OR Legume as Vegetable: 7/8 cup vegetable and 1/4 cup fruit.

Tips for Soaking Dry Beans
1 lb. dry black beans = about 2 1/4 cups dry or 4 1/2 cups cooked beans.
Overnight Method: Add 1 3/4 qt. cold water to every 1 lb. of dry beans. Cover and refrigerate overnight. Discard the water. Proceed with recipe.
Quick-Soak Method: Boil 1 3/4 qt. of water for each 1 lb. of dry beans. Add beans and boil for 2 minutes. Remove from heat and allow to soak for 1 hour. Discard the water. Proceed with recipe.

Tips for Cooking Dry Beans
Once the beans have been soaked, add 1 3/4 qt. water for every lb. of dry beans. Boil gently with lid tilted until tender, about 2 hours. Use cooked beans immediately.

Critical Control Point: Hold for hot service at 140 °F or higher or chill for later use. To chill, cool to 70 °F within 2 hours and to 40 °F or lower within an additional 4 hours.

 For a quantity recipe that yields 25 or 50 servings see: https://whatscooking.fns.usda.gov/quantity/child-nutrition-cnp/tropical-bean-salad.

Quick Quesadilla

Quick Quesadilla
Makes: 6 Servings
Prep time: 20 minutes
Cook time: 15 minutes

Quesadillas, a popular menu item in Mexico, are made by folding a corn or flour tortilla in half and filling it with a variety of ingredients such as vegetables, cheese, beans, and meat. This recipe puts a twist on the traditional favorite by baking the quesadillas, instead of toasting them on a griddle or in a pan. This allows you to cook several at one time. Try topping these quesadillas with avocado, cilantro, or salsa.

Ingredients

2 1/4 cups Spinach, frozen, chopped (2 1/4 cups thawed and drained yields 1 1/2 cups)
1 cup Dark red kidney beans, canned, no salt added, drained and rinsed or kidney beans, dry, cooked
1 teaspoon Garlic powder
1/2 teaspoon Onion powder
1/4 teaspoon Chili powder
4 Whole-grain tortillas, 8″ (at least 51 gm each)
1 1/2 cups Mozzarella cheese, low-fat, shredded
Nonstick cooking spray

Directions

1. Thaw, drain, and squeeze excess liquid from spinach. Yields: 1 1/2 cups (7 1/2 oz.)
2. Preheat oven to 350 °F.
3. Place kidney beans in a small microwavable bowl.
4. Add garlic powder, onion powder, and chili powder.
5. Lightly mash beans by squeezing using gloved hands (at least 50% of the beans should appear whole). Be careful not to over-mash beans.
6. Heat in microwave for 1 minute. Stir with a spoon.
7. Prepare quesadillas:
a. Place half of the tortillas on a baking sheet. Spread 3/4 cup of spinach on each tortilla. Top each with 3/8 cup of bean mixture and 3/4 cup of cheese.
b. Place remaining tortillas on top.
c. Spray outside of filled quesadillas with nonstick cooking spray.
8. Bake for 15 minutes. Heat quesadillas to an internal temperature of 140 °F or higher for at least 15 seconds.
9. Cut each quesadilla into 6 wedges.
10. Serve 2 wedges or 1/3 quesadilla.
Optional: Serve with sliced or mashed avocado, cilantro or salsa.
Critical Control Point: Hold at 140 °F or higher.

Notes

CACFP Crediting Information:
2 wedges (1/3 quesadilla) provides Legume as Meat Alternate: 1 1/2 oz. equivalent meat alternate, 1/4 cup vegetable, and 1 oz. equivalent grains OR Legume as Vegetable: 1 oz. equivalent meat alternate, 3/8 cup vegetable, and 1 oz. equivalent grains.

Tips for Soaking Dry Beans
1 lb. dry kidney beans = about 2 1/2 cups dry or 6 1/4 cups cooked beans.
Overnight Method: Add 1 3/4 qt. cold water to every 1 lb. of dry beans. Cover and refrigerate overnight. Discard the water. Proceed with recipe.
Quick-Soak Method: Boil 1 3/4 qt. of water for each 1 lb. of dry beans. Add beans and boil for 2 minutes. Remove from heat and allow to soak for 1 hour. Discard the water. Proceed with recipe.

Tips for Cooking Dry Beans
Once the beans have been soaked, add 1 3/4 qt. water for every lb. of dry beans. Boil gently with lid tilted until tender, about 2 hours. Use cooked beans immediately.
Critical Control Point: Hold for hot service at 140 °F or higher or chill for later use. To chill, cool to 70 °F within 2 hours and to 40 °F or lower within an additional 4 hours
For a quantity recipe that yields 25 or 50 servings see: https://whatscooking.fns.usda.gov/quantity/child-nutrition-cnp/quick-quesadilla.

Baked Cod Olé Recipe

Baked Cod Olé
Makes: 6 Servings
Prep time: 10 minutes
Cook time: 15 minutes

In Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, Barbados, and other parts of the Caribbean seafood is very popular. Each island has its own specialty dish and many include baked fish. Cod is a popular choice; it is versatile and can be baked, poached, or grilled.

Ingredients

3 tablespoons Lime juice, fresh squeezed, seeds removed or bottled lime juice (2 limes = about 3 Tbsp lime juice)
1/2 teaspoon Olive oil
1/4 teaspoon Black pepper, ground
1/4 teaspoon Salt, table
1 1/4 cups Tomatoes, fresh, 1/4″ diced
1 1/4 cups Onions, fresh, peeled, 1/4″ diced
2 tablespoons Cilantro, fresh, chopped
13 1/2 ounces Cod fish fillets, fresh or frozen (each piece should be about 2 1/4 oz)
Nonstick cooking spray

Directions

1. Preheat oven to 400 °F.
2. To make dressing: In a small bowl, whisk together lime juice, olive oil, black pepper, and salt.
3. Prepare salsa: In a medium bowl, combine tomatoes, onions, and cilantro. Add dressing and toss.
4. Coat baking sheet with nonstick cooking spray.
5. Place fish portions on a baking sheet with about 1” of space between each piece.
6. Top each piece of fish with 1/3 cup (about 2 1/3 oz.) salsa.
7. Roast for 12-15 minutes. When done, fish will flake easily with a fork. Heat to an internal temperature of 145 °F for at least 15 seconds.
8. Serve 1 fillet topped with 1/3 cup salsa.
Critical Control Point: Hold at 140 °F.

Notes

CACFP Crediting Information:
1 fish fillet topped with 1/3 cup salsa provides 1 1/2 oz. equivalent meat and 1/4 cup vegetable.

Variations:
Tilapia, halibut, or other white fish can be substituted for cod.

For a quantity recipe that yields 25 or 50 servings see: https://whatscooking.fns.usda.gov/quantity/child-nutrition-cnp/baked-cod-ol.

Red Beans and Rice Recipe

 Red Beans and Rice
Makes: 6 Servings
Prep time: 10 minutes
Cook time: 20 minutes

Rice and beans is a staple dish in many South American countries. The popular duo is sometimes called “casamiento” or “matrimonio,” which means wedding or marriage. Rice and beans is also a popular part of Creole cuisine in Louisiana.

Ingredients

1 tablespoon Olive oil
1 1/2 cups Onions, fresh, peeled, 1/4″ diced
1 1/2 cups Green bell peppers, fresh, 1/4″ diced
3 cloves Garlic, fresh, minced (1 clove is about 1/2 teaspoon minced)
3/4 cup Brown rice, instant, uncooked
2 teaspoons Cumin, ground
2 teaspoons Oregano, leaves, dried
1/2 teaspoon Salt, table
1/2 teaspoon Black pepper, ground
2 cups Chicken broth, low-sodium
3 cups Dark red kidney beans, canned, low-sodium, drained and rinsed or kidney beans, dry, cooked

Directions

1. Heat oil on medium-high in a medium skillet.
2. Add onions and peppers and sauté for about 3 minutes or until onions are soft.
3. Reduce heat to medium.
4. Stir in garlic, brown rice, cumin, oregano, salt, and pepper. Cook for 1 minute or until rice and spices become toasted, stirring constantly.
5. When rice and spices are toasted, immediately add chicken broth. Stir, increase heat to medium-high, and bring to a boil.
6. Stir in kidney beans. Reduce heat to medium and simmer for 5 minutes or until rice becomes tender. Heat to a temperature of 140 °F for at least 15 seconds.
7. Serve 3/4 cup.
Critical Control Point: Hold at 140 °F.

Notes

CACFP Crediting Information:

3/4 cup provides Legume as Meat Alternate: 1 1/2 oz. equivalent meat alternate, 1/4 cup vegetable and 1/2 oz. equivalent grain OR Legume as Vegetable: No equivalent meat alternate and 5/8 cup vegetable and 1/2 oz. equivalent grains.

Tips for Soaking Dry Beans

1 lb. dry kidney beans = about 2 1/2 cups dry or 6 1/4 cups cooked beans.

Overnight Method: Add 1 3/4 qt. cold water to every 1 lb. of dry beans. Cover and refrigerate overnight. Discard the water. Proceed with recipe.

Quick-Soak Method: Boil 1 3/4 qt. of water for each 1 lb. of dry beans. Add beans and boil for 2 minutes. Remove from heat and allow to soak for 1 hour. Discard the water. Proceed with recipe.

Tips for Cooking Dry Beans

Once the beans have been soaked, add 1 3/4 qt. water for every lb. of dry beans. Boil gently with lid tilted until tender, about 2 hours. Use cooked beans immediately.

Critical Control Point: Hold for hot service at 140 °F or higher or chill for later use. To chill, cool to 70 °F within 2 hours and to 40 °F or lower within an additional 4 hours.

For a quantity recipe that yields 25 or 50 servings see: https://whatscooking.fns.usda.gov/quantity/child-nutrition-cnp/red-beans-and-rice.

Breast Cancer Awareness Month

By Lebanon Family Health Services

Recently, the American Cancer Society released a hopeful report that stated that death rates from breast cancer have dropped 34% since 1990.  This sharp decrease is a strong testament to the steadfast efforts of health advocates working to promote national and local awareness campaigns about the importance of early detection and increased research for breast cancer.  Each year, this is evident in the month of October as we recognize National Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

While we celebrate this progress, the fact remains that breast cancer is still the most common cancer diagnosed among women, only being surpassed by skin cancer.  In fact, breast cancer accounts for 1 in 3 of all cancers diagnosed in women.  According to the Centers for Disease Control, 40,000 women die each year from breast cancer even though it is one of the most preventable forms of cancer.

Therefore, this month we must celebrate and build on the lessons we have learned over the past couple decades.  This means continuing to spread the word about the importance of early detection and supporting efforts that have aided countless women to take control of their personal health.  This starts with knowing the common signs and symptoms of breast cancer, such as:

  • New lumps or a lump in your breast that has changed
  • Change in the size or shape of the breast
  • Pain in the breast or nipple that does not go away
  • Flaky, red, or swollen skin anywhere on the breast
  • A nipple that is very tender or that turns inward
  • Blood or any other type of fluid coming from the nipple (not breast milk)

Along with knowing the common signs, practicing basic health and wellness is essential.  By staying physically active with regular exercise, maintaining a healthy weight, and limiting alcohol consumption a woman can reduce her risk for developing breast cancer.  Furthermore, if you are over the age of 50, you should be getting a routine mammogram.  Finally, carefully discussing with your healthcare professional the costs and risks associated with using Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) at menopause is an essential component in maintaining breast health.

For over 40 years, Lebanon Family Health has been a local resource for women to diagnose breast cancer at its early stages and as a result, has aided them in seeking treatment.  During the month of October, help support our continued efforts to combat breast cancer by participating in our “Pink Drink” campaign.  Throughout the county, various establishments are supporting this initiative by selling their featured “Pink Drink” and collecting $1 donations from their patrons.  A portion of all proceeds will assist us in continuing to bring these lifesaving practices to the women of Lebanon County.

New Jersey man pays attention to family history, and lives to tell about it

By American Heart Association News

Sammy Rabin doesn’t like to brag but, until he learned he needed triple bypass surgery, he’d considered himself “the poster child for good health.”

He’d been exercising regularly for 30 years, ate a vegetarian diet and ran marathons.

“I did everything I could to stay healthy,” said Rabin, 65, the director of operations for a travel company in Fairfield, New Jersey. “I had to, because I had genetics working against me.”

Rabin’s father, Jack, died of a heart attack when he was 68. His brother, Arthur, died from one when he was only 46.

Sammy Rabin with his father, Jack, who died of a heart attack at 68. (Photo courtesy of Sammy Rabin)

But Rabin had always felt fit and strong and so he wasn’t concerned when he felt a mild pain in his chest in 2013 while training for the Philadelphia Marathon.

“I thought I’d pulled a muscle, even when it hurt for three days straight,” he said.

But on the fourth day, when the pain started radiating down his arm, he realized it wasn’t something to toy with.

He called his cardiologist to describe his symptoms and, before he’d even finished, the doctor stopped him mid-sentence and said he wanted Rabin in his office the very next morning.

A stress test, heart scan and angiogram revealed serious blockages in three of Rabin’s coronary arteries. The doctor said the situation was so serious, he wanted to do bypass surgery that night.

But Rabin put the brakes on that notion.

“I wanted some other opinions,” he said.

He talked to five other cardiologists, and four of them recommended surgery.

The fifth? He suggested stents, but with the caveat that, if Rabin went that route, he’d never be able to run like he had before.

“I decided to have the surgery,” he said.

Giovanni Campanile, M.D., Rabin’s cardiologist, said it’s rare for someone like him to have such severe coronary blockages.

“I told Sammy that if he didn’t live the kind of healthy lifestyle he did, he might have had a heart attack 10 years earlier,” said Campanile, director of Ornish Intensive Cardiac Rehabilitation at Morristown Medical Center in New Jersey.

The bypass surgery went well and Rabin was soon walking the hospital corridors. Released after only five days, he was jogging slowly within three and a half weeks.

Sammy Rabin and his wife, Debra, at a resort two months after his heart surgery. His chest scar is visible. (Photo courtesy of Sammy Rabin)

But the recovery wasn’t without its bumps. Several weeks after surgery he had a bout of pericarditis, an inflammation of the fluid-filled sac called the pericardium that surrounds the heart. An anti-inflammatory cleared up the condition and he hasn’t had a relapse.

According to Campanile, at least once a year and for the foreseeable future, Rabin will undergo testing to measure blood flow through his coronary arteries. And, if he continues living his healthy lifestyle, his long-term prognosis is excellent.

Still, Campanile cautioned, when it comes to heart health, Rabin’s story highlights the importance of looking beyond the numbers, such as cholesterol and blood pressure, and taking your family history into account.

“Because both his father and brother died of heart attacks, Sammy knew to see a doctor when he was having those chest pains,” said Campanile. “That probably saved his life.”

Two years to the day following his surgery, Rabin ran the 2015 New York City Marathon. While his time of 5 hours, 10 minutes, 6 seconds was his slowest ever and well off his personal best of 3:36:43, he no longer keeps his eye on the clock.

He has bigger things on his mind.

“That marathon was the most meaningful and rewarding one ever for me,” he said. “After crossing the finish line, I had tears mixing in with my sweat. I felt blessed to be running at all.”

Sammy Rabin in 2015, as he neared the finish line of the New York City Marathon. (Photo courtesy of Sammy Rabin)

Self-care: What is it and how do you do it?

By American Heart Association News

Self-care is more important to your overall health than pretty much anything else, and the term is catching fire. But what does it really mean?

A new scientific statement issued Thursday by the American Heart Association outlines the importance of self-care in the prevention and management of heart disease and stroke. After all, self-care contributes 40 percent to a patient’s health, followed by social circumstances and environment accounting for 20 percent, and inadequate medical care accounting for only about 10 percent, according to the report published in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

This reality highlights the critical need for healthcare providers to tell patients how to take care of themselves and for patients to follow through on tending to their own well-being.

What is self-care?

Self-care is the process heart disease and stroke patients adopt to maintain, monitor and manage their medical conditions. Self-care is also vital for preventing cardiovascular diseases.

It encompasses the basics of having a healthy lifestyle, but also includes more practical things such as adhering to a drug regimen and paying attention to new or worsening symptoms.

Where did the idea of self-care originate?

The concept is as old as time. Before the advent of modern medicine, people only had themselves and their communities to alleviate sickness.

However, during the 1960s and 1970s social changes spurred people to take a more active role in their health, said Barbara Riegel, Ph.D., R.N., a professor of nursing at the University of Pennsylvania. Self-care has become a more integral treatment component as evidence of its effectiveness has mounted.

“There is really strong outcomes data on the effects of self-care, but I don’t think we put as much energy into it as we should,” said Riegel, lead author of the new statement.

Why is it especially important now?

The world’s population is getting older and heavier, and age and weight are major risks for chronic conditions, particularly heart disease and stroke.

By 2050, the global population of those 60 and older will more than double, from 841 million in 2013 to more than 2 billion in 2050, according to a United Nations report. Meanwhile, a recent New England Journal of Medicine study found that 17 percent of the world’s population — nearly 108 million children and 604 million adults — is obese.

The sicker population will further burden the health care system, increasing the need for cost-effective treatments. It’s much less expensive for patients to adopt an exercise program than to wind up in the hospital having a heart attack — and better for them too.

How do self-care and medical care intersect?

They are complementary.

Patients still need to visit their health care providers to ensure their conditions are properly diagnosed and monitored. Doctors or other medical professionals will develop a treatment plan that likely combines elements of traditional medicine such as prescription drugs with self-care measures.

What are the obstacles to self-care?

Not all doctors take time to discuss the importance of self-care and particular strategies with their patients, said Gina Lundberg, M.D., clinical director of the Emory Women’s Heart Center in Atlanta.

She said that sometimes patients won’t heed doctors’ advice even after being presented with the bleak scenarios that are likely to stem from the failure to take medication or follow recommendations to make lifestyle changes such as losing weight.

“Lifestyle is so important that noncompliance here may cause the greatest harm,” said Lundberg.

Another problem is that conditions like high blood pressure or high cholesterol don’t have physical manifestations, making it easier for patients to justify ignoring advice.

And adopting healthy changes like eating a more balanced diet doesn’t immediately show results. It’s easy to get frustrated and resort to old eating habits when the scale doesn’t budge after weeks of forgoing ice cream.

Modifying behavior can be a tougher road if patients lack family and community support. Riegel recalled an instance when a family’s primary cook balked at adapting recipes or preparing special meals to accommodate the patient.

“You want family participation and positive reinforcement,” said Riegel.

There are also environmental barriers to improving health that are beyond the control of patients, their families and doctors. Some neighborhoods lack safe places to exercise or stores that sell healthy, affordable food. Restaurant portions can be enormous.

“Health is a shared responsibility,” said Riegel. “Communities need to put in sidewalks. The media needs to get the word out about health. No one can do this alone.”

Upcoming Events

Dec 5, 2018

Free Community Health Screenings

UPMC Pinnacle will be performing Free screening to help you manage your health. Please register in advance to attend. Participants...

Dec 6, 2018

Diabetes Support Group: Diabetes Foot Care

2018 Diabetes Support Group Please join us for FREE diabetes support group meetings! Location: WellSpan Good Samaritan Hospital – Dixon...
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